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Naomi Rothwell-Boyd, May 21 2022

10 Easy Steps To Uncover What Career Is Right For Me (2022)

Help! What career is right for me?

It's not always easy to know what career is right for you. In fact, many people go through their entire lives without finding the right fit. If you're feeling lost and don't know what to do next, don't worry – you're not alone.

As a career change coach I see this all the time. I've also seen how coaching steps work wonders for a career search.

The good news is that there are some steps you can take to uncover what career is right for you. In this guide, we will discuss 10 easy steps that will help get you closer to finding the answer!

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The 10 Easy Steps

1) Identify what's not working for you today
2) List your minimum requirements
3) Identify your core values 
4) Note your personal interests
5) Pick out your transferable skills
6) Define your optimal working environment
7) Prioritise your requirements
8) Brainstorm any career possibilities 
9) Research industries using your filters
10) Talk with people to learn more

1) Identify what's not working for you today

A great first step is to write down what is definitely not working for you in your job and career today. This could be anything from the company culture to your daily tasks. Once you have a good understanding of what isn't working, it will be easier to discover what is best suited to your needs!

What's not working for you today?

Listing what's not working for you is a helpful way to explore what you might want in a future career. It can also help you eliminate options that definitely wouldn't be a good fit.

2) List your minimum requirements

Now that you have a picture of what doesn't work, you should find it much easier to write down your non-negotiable needs from your job and career. These could be things like salary, location, or company culture etc. It's important to determine what would lead to your satisfaction based on an honest and complete assessment of your situation today.

What are your minimum requirements?

Your minimum requirements will help you filter out any jobs or careers that wouldn't be a good fit for your search or working style. That way, you can focus your energy on finding the right option for you!

By taking the time to list what is and isn't working for you in your career, as well as your minimum requirements, you're already one step closer to uncovering what might be a good fit for you.

3) Identify your core values

Your core values are the things that matter to you most in life. When you're making a decision, your core values should always be taken into consideration.

Some examples of core values could be:

If you're not sure what your core values are, take some time to think about what is most important to you. Once you have a good understanding of your core values, you can use them to help guide your career decisions.

4) Note your personal interests

This exercise is fairly obvious, you should take into account if any personal interests would actually suit you as a long term career. If you're not sure what your interests are, make a list of things you enjoy doing in your spare time.

Once you have a good understanding of what your personal interests are, there are endless possibilities when it comes to matching them with a potential career.

This does not mean you must match your personal interests with your career. It's common for people to find their work interests are different, and that pursuing them separately provides a nice balance. There is no single answer for everyone, you need to decide for yourself.

5) Pick out your transferable skills 

Transferable skills are the skills that you've acquired through your experiences and can apply to other situations. For example, if you're a great communicator, that's a transferable skill that would be valuable in any job.

Some examples of transferable skills are:

If you're not sure what your transferable skills are, take some time to think about what strengths you bring to any situation. Chances are, you have more transferable skills than you realise!

6) Define your optimal working environment